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Looking to the future: the value of entrepreneurship in an age of digital disruption

December 15, 2020

Looking to the future: the value of entrepreneurship in an age of digital disruption
 
powered by Sounder

There are two types of disruption: 
  1. The thing that disrupted you because you didn’t see it coming
  2. The thing that disrupted you that you did see coming, but you didn’t do anything about
 

But what if you do want to do something about it? You’d need to see it coming first.
 
In this episode of B2B Tech Talk, Keri Roberts is joined again by Matthew Griffin, an international advisor at 311 Institute and Wells Future Forum and speaker on the Future of Technology, to discuss futuristic thinking and the value of entrepreneurship in an age of digital disruption.
 
Matt also explains:
  • How he has helped companies think far into the future
  • How those in the B2B tech space can prepare for the future of work right now
  • How organizations and individuals can flourish within disruption
  • How to train employees with skills that complement AI


How to respond to AI to prepare for the future

White collar and blue collar workers have little to fear from traditional hardware-based robotic systems, but there are grounds for worry when it comes to the adoption and development of new software-based robots and autonomous systems.
 
As jobs of the future start to emerge, organizations need to create competency matrices. Soft skills can be quickly mapped out, but in order to map out hard skills, organizations have to be able to define what the job is actually going to be. This is where they need foresight and adaptability built into the workforce model.
 
Leaders should be working with internal and external stakeholders to evaluate what kind of training would be needed for employees to develop skills that complement AI technologies.


Access to education and the value of entrepreneurship

Today, over half of the employees in the American workforce don’t like the jobs they’re doing … so why do they do it?
 
First, there’s a chasm between the work people want to do and finding a way to do it.
 
During the global recession of 2008, there were huge numbers of employees, many very highly skilled, being made redundant. The next year, there was a massive number of new registered startups. People were forced to pursue a different route. Given the current state of the world, the next couple of years will likely hold the same trend.
 
Second, there’s very little education when it comes to futuristic thinking or navigating future careers. If an individual has increasing access to technologies and tools that allow them to do the things they want to do, the question becomes, “How am I going to do it?” You start by getting trained, whether through the formal education system or informal platforms such as YouTube.
 
Today it’s easier to set up a business than ever before. Using modern technologies, individuals can make a difference globally in a way they could never have done 10-20 years ago.


Get ready for disruption

There are two types of disruption: the thing that disrupted you because you didn’t see it coming and the thing that disrupted you that you did see coming, but you didn’t do anything about. The world has always changed and is always changing.
 
As an individual, get ahead of disruption by getting out of your comfort zone, looking at the things you’re interested in and finding a way to use your skills to impact them.
 
As an organization, get ahead of disruption by creating an accepting culture, one that is open to changing roles.
 
As a leader, get ahead of disruption by getting away from a confined definition of your industry. Digital erodes barriers between previously distinct industries like never before, giving you the opportunity to train your employees with future developments in mind. The best leaders are those who prepare employees for life without them.
 
Technology has accelerated rapidly over the last 10 years and will continue to do so for the next 10 years and beyond. It’s not a question of when things change, it’s a question of what you’re going to do about it.